Office For Mac

Using portrait and landscape orientation in the same presentation

(This post was originally written and published by Erik Jenson. We’ve updated it for Excel for Mac 2011.)

Many of you want to use both portrait (shown here as image 1) and landscape (image 2) slide orientation in the same presentation. It makes sense, and presentations with both orientations look great.

And while we don’t like to deliver news that you might not want to hear, a single PowerPoint presentation can’t contain both. It has to be one or the other. Hopefully, we saved you some time by just coming out and saying that.

Now for the good news – there’s a workaround that you can use to make it look like one presentation contains both landscape and portrait orientation. And even better, your audience will never know the difference. We know it’s not an ideal solution, but hopefully it’ll help. Here’s how it works:

By default, PowerPoint for Mac presentations are set up in landscape orientation. But you can link two presentations (one in landscape, and the other in portrait) to display both portrait and landscape slides in what appears to be one presentation.
Link two presentations in PowerPoint for Mac


Note: Place both presentations in the same folder before you create links. That way, if the folder is copied to a CD or moved, the presentations will still link correctly. To change all the slides in your presentation to portrait orientation, on the Themes tab, in the Page Setup group, expand the Slide Size button menu, click Page Setup, and then click Orientation: Portrait.


 First, create a link from the first presentation to the second presentation:

  1. In the first presentation, select the text or object that you want to click to link to the second presentation.
  2. On the Slide Show tab, in the Set Up group, click Action Settings.
  3. In the Action Settings dialog box, click Hyperlink to, and then select Other PowerPoint Presentation from the list.
  4. Locate and click the second presentation, and then click OK. The Hyperlink to Slidedialog box appears.
  5. In the Hyperlink to Slide dialog box, under Slide title, click the slide that you want to link to, and then click OK.
  6. Click OK in the Action Settings dialog box.

Second, create a link from the second presentation back to the first presentation:

  1. In the second presentation, select the text or object that you want to click to link to the first presentation.
  2. On the Slide Show tab, in the Set Up group, click Action Settings.
  3. In the Action Settings dialog box, click Hyperlink to, and then select Other PowerPoint Presentationfrom the list.
  4. Locate and click the first presentation, and then click OK. The Hyperlink to Slidedialog box appears.
  5. In the Hyperlink to Slide dialog box, under Slide title, click the slide that you want to link to, and then click OK.
  6. Click OK in the Action Settings dialog box.

Now you can click through your presentation seamlessly, even though you’re switching between two different presentations with different slide orientations!

 

August 14th, 2012
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2 Comments
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  1. Steve Rindsberg says:

    “Now you can click through your presentation seemlessly, even though your switching between two different presentations with different slide orientations!”

    Make that “seamlessly” instead of “seemlessly” and “you’re” instead of “your” and I’ll buy it as valid English.

    And instead of linking back to the first presentation, make it an End Show link in the second presentation and I’ll buy it as good PowerPoint practice.

    See if you link from Presentation A to Presentation B, you have both presentations open at once. If you link back to Presentation A, you leave B open. If you later link to Presentation C and back to A, you now have A, B and C open. Then when you quit A (intending to be done with the show) you find that you have other presentations open, stuff that you didn’t intend for the audience to see. OOPS.

    If instead you put an End Show link on B, it just goes away, you’re left back where you started in Presentation A, you don’t have a litter of other presentations sitting open, and when you end A, nothing unexpected’s left on screen.

    • Office for Mac Team says:

      Thanks for your feedback, Steve!
      I’ve made the corrections, and I’m happy you’ve provided an additional tip! :)